GFGRG Networking Event – Wednesday 30th August at the RGS-IBG Conference

You are warmly invited to join us for a networking lunch at this year’s RGS-IBG Annual Conference.

The lunch sponsored by the GFGRG will take place on Wednesday lunchtime in the Tea Room.

Grab your packed lunch and join us in the tearoom for a lunchtime of networking. This year the GFGRG will be conducting appreciative inquiry to collate good practice in academia. Everyone is welcome at any stage or level of geography, it won’t take long, it won’t be difficult and you’ll come away with some sound advice on how to survive academia.

If you have any questions, please contact Eve – eveleigh.buck@gmail.com or if you can’t make the event and wish to receive feedback from the day please make contact and we will put you on the mailing list.

We look forward to seeing you in September,

GFGRG.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on GFGRG Networking Event – Wednesday 30th August at the RGS-IBG Conference

Book Launch – Thursday 31st August

The GFGRG is excited to be hosting the launch of Erin Sanders-McDonagh’s monograph Women and Sex Tourism Landscapes during the RGS-IBG’s Annual International Conference.

Woman and Sex Tourism Landscapes focuses on the ways in which women interact with and explore sexual spaces in two specific touristic contexts – Amsterdam and
Thailand. Ethnographic data collected in both countries suggests that far from being male-centered spaces, the red light districts and associated sexual entertainment venues
are very much open to female tourists. The author argues that some women are indeed interested in exploring sexualized zones challenging assumptions about women’s
involvements with sexual space. By exploring these spaces with geography as a theoretical starting point, this analysis brings a new angle to understanding these types of sexual
zones, with a feminist edge.

All are invited to join us for the book launch which will take place on Wednesday 31st August at 18.45 in the RGS-IBG Drayson Room.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Book Launch – Thursday 31st August

GFGRG at the RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2017

We are delighted to be sponsoring a number of different panels, networking events and book launches at this year’s RGS-IBG Annual International Conference.

Below are the dates, times and places of each of our sessions.  Please click on the links for more details of each session:

Wednesday 30th August

Session 1 – 9-10.40

The Costs of Decolonizing the Discipline (1) (Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Lecture Theatre G34)

Transformative Stories: Trauma, Therapeutic Geographies and Hope (Sherfield/SALC Building, Room 5)

Session 2 – 11.10-12.50

The Costs of Decolonizing the Discipline (2) (Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Lecture Theatre G34)

Plenary and lunch – 13.10-14.25

GFGRG mentoring and networking session (RGS-IBG Tea Room)

This lunch time session will provide a space for GFGRG members and non-members to meet and network during the conference. The session is to promote mentoring within the research group, enabling postgraduates and early career researchers to access advice and guidance from more experienced members.

Session 3 – 14.40-16.20

Home futures: towards a critical feminist geography of housing, ageing and health (1) (Skempton Building, Lecture Theatre 201)

Rethinking decolonial and postcolonial knowledges beyond regions (1) (Sherfield/SALC Building, Pippard Lecture Theatre)

Session 4 – 16.50-18.30

Home futures: towards a critical feminist geography of housing, ageing and health (2) (Skempton Building, Lecture Theatre 201)

Rethinking decolonial and postcolonial knowledges beyond regions (2) (Sherfield/SALC Building, Pippard Lecture Theatre)

Evening

GFGRG Dinner at Thai Square

Thursday 31st August

Session 1 – 9-10.40

Innovative Research within Gender & Feminist Geography (1) (Skempton Building, Room 064a)

Session 2 – 11.10-12.50

Innovative Research within Gender & Feminist Geography (2) (Skempton Building, Room 064a)

Plenary and lunch – 13.10-14.25

GFGRG AGM (Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Room 120)

We are looking to fill the following posts:

Secretary (1): This key role takes the form of organising and minuting of meetings and other GFGRG activities. This role also involves being an active member of our committee attending 3-4 committee meetings a year (usually via Skype) and helping with any other activities/events that GFGRG organises. Preference may be given to RGS-IBG members.This post is for three years.

Membership Secretary (1): We are looking for someone to handle membership promotion, enquiries and sign ups/renewals. This role also involves being an active member of our committee attending 3-4 committee meetings a year (usually via Skype) and helping with any other activities/events that GFGRG organises. Preference may be given to RGS-IBG members.This post is for three years.

Dissertation Prize Co-ordinators (2): This role involves co-organising and co-running our annual undergraduate dissertation prize and being an active member of our committee (see above). We are looking for two people to work alongside our one continuing dissertation prize coordinator. Typical duties include writing to sponsors, managing the assessment of the entries, marketing the prize and communicating with entrants. Preference may be given to members of RGS-IBG. This post is for three years.

Postgraduate members (2): We are looking for two postgraduates to be on our committee to represent postgraduate needs and concerns, to initiate GFGRG events for postgraduates, be an active member of our committee (see above) and to also organise and lead the GFGRG postgraduate sessions at the annual RGS-IBG conference. Preference may be given to RGS-IBG members. This post is for one year.

Ordinary members (up to 2): We are looking for people to join our committee who do not have a designated role, but play an active role in the committee (see above) and help with organising/running our various activities and events. Preference may be given to RGS-IBG members. This post is for three years.

Expressions of interest in the above posts can be given up until the start of the AGM either in person to myself or via email (katherine.brickell@rhul.ac.uk). If you are not able to attend our AGM but you would like to stand for one of the above posts, please email me a short paragraph outlining which position you are interested in and what experience/skills you have that you think would be useful for the post.

Session 3 – 14.40-16.20

Que(e)rying Gender, Tourism and Mobilities (1) (Skempton Building, Room 064a)

Session 4 – 16.50-18.30

Que(e)rying Gender, Tourism and Mobilities (2) (Skempton Building, Room 064a)

Evening – 18.45-20.00

Monograph Launch: Women and Sex Tourism Landscapes  by Erin Sanders-McDonagh (RGS-IBG Drayson Room)

Friday 1st September

Session 1 – 9-10.40

Geographies of Safe Space (1): Spaces of embodiment, identity and education (Skempton Building, Lecture Theatre 207)

Session 2 – 11.10-12.50

Geographies of Safe Space (2): Spaces of refuge, shelter and contact (Skempton Building, Lecture Theatre 207)

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on GFGRG at the RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2017

GFGRG Dinner – Wednesday 30th August

A reminder that this year the meal for the GFGRG will will be held on Wednesday 30th August at Thai Square, 19 Exhibition Road, South Kensington.  Please sign up via this link by August 14th including what you would like to eat and the total price.

Members and potential members, all welcome.

This is a great opportunity to meet and socialise with other members of the research group and find out more about our areas of interest and activities.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on GFGRG Dinner – Wednesday 30th August

A Brief Introduction to the Feminist Archive South. By Maria Fannin

The University of Bristol holds a unique collection of materials related to feminist and women’s liberation movements in the UK. The Feminist Archive South is based in the University’s Special Collections department where I have been working with a trustee of the archive, D-M Withers, to put together a teaching resource for lecturers who want to include materials from the archive in their teaching. The archive was established primarily through the work of activists who contributed their personal collections and by the acquisition of materials by feminist archivists on a vast array of topics. Most of the materials date from the period 1960-2000 and include everything from books, magazines, posters and personal letters to vinyl records, clothing, badges and other ephemera.

image(Photo credit: D-M Withers, 2017)

The collection was catalogued using the indexing system of the European Women’s Thesaurus. In archivists’ terms, a thesaurus provides a list of terms used to classify or index and locate information in libraries. As Tilly Vriend writes, the major classification systems such as the Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress systems are not neutral tools for organising and classifying information and materials, but reflect the particular presumptions of their creators and are the products of social and political forces. The Universal Decimal System has the more well-known examples of how sexism shapes the practices of indexing: in this system, “the term Women could be found under the category Morals and Customs, Menstruation under Medicine, and Lesbian women under categories such as Psychopaths and Hysterics” (Vriend 2009: 3). The European Women’s Thesaurus and its precursor, the Dutch Women’s Thesaurus, sought to explicitly reject these tendencies and generate new categories.

FAS Periodicals(Photo credit: D-M Withers, 2017)

The archive thus marks the important role that women’s libraries played as sources of information in an analogue age. In the heterogeneous array of materials brought together in the archive, we are also witness to the historical and geographical ‘event’ of bringing new kinds of political subjects into being. The archive contains the papers of several Bristol-based feminist activists, some of whom authored Half the Sky, one of the first British women’s and gender studies readers, published by Virago in 1979 and aimed at providing a resource for adult education courses in women’s studies. It holds print runs of magazines such as Mukti and FOWAAD written and published by black and Asian feminists in the UK to address sexism, racism and imperialism. There is material related to Greenham Common, guides for the volunteer pregnancy testers holding free pregnancy test clinics in an era before home testing, and so much more. My attention is drawn to the many materials related to ‘being a body’, including testimonials from the late 1970s of experiences of menstruation and volumes of leaflets and essays on feminist concerns over health and technology. Materials on birth, contraception, abortion, menopause, HIV/AIDS, drug use and cervical cancer are there, as well as organizational materials related to disability support groups, to the establishment of Well Women centres around the UK and to efforts to connect transnational feminist health activists with each other. And there is an intriguing account of architectural plans for feminist antenatal waiting rooms in the NHS!

The archive is in need of extensive cataloguing, so in addition to generating examples of how material in the archive can be used for teaching, we hope to secure resources to help carry out this important work. Our aim is to also incorporate collective annotation in the next phase of the archive’s life as a digital resource in which readers in the archive provide their own descriptions of materials in the catalogue to be shared with others.  This corresponds to the collective and revolutionary spirit that animated the feminist archive at its inception – to preserve and sustain alternative sources of knowledge and experience. In this way, we are exploring how theories of digital culture (Withers 2015) and the ‘social scientist in the archive’ (Moore et al. 2016) can contribute to making the archive a community and communal resource for educators, researchers and activists. D-M and I will be presenting our work in and on the Feminist Archive South at a workshop on ‘Making School in the Age of the Screen’ at Liverpool Hope University on the 26-27 May 2017 and at a public exhibition as part of the University of Bristol’s Brigstow Institute on the 23-24 October 2017.  If you’re in Bristol, you can visit the archive by contacting the wonderful Special Collections librarians or come to one of our upcoming ‘Collective Annotation’ workshops in June and July 2017. And do get in touch if you want to know more!

Dr Maria Fannin is from the School of Geographical Studies at the University of Bristol.

Contact: m.fannin@bristol.ac.uk

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on A Brief Introduction to the Feminist Archive South. By Maria Fannin

Upcoming events: 9th-10th June 2017, Genesis of a New Human Being with Luce Irigaray, University of Bristol

Genesis of a New Human Being with Luce Irigaray

1 ½ day conference

9-10 June 2017

University of Bristol, BS8 1TU

To Be Born

Philosopher Luce Irigaray’s new book To Be Born (Palgrave, 2017) offers a new way of conceiving what it means to be born. This conference explores birth, breath, the nature of origins, and the concept of being. Luce Irigaray is joined by an interdisciplinary group of scholars exploring different approaches to the themes in To Be Born.

Luce Irigaray is one of the most important thinkers of our time. She is director of research in philosophy at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris and author of more than thirty books translated into numerous languages, the most recent of which are Sharing the World (2008), In the Beginning, She Was (2012) and with Michael Marder, Through Vegetal Being (2016).

£40 standard | £30 students/concessions

Programme and registration details here: https://tinyurl.com/kovaagg

How to Give Birth to a New Human Being

Luce Irigaray

A Bristol Festival of Ideas Public Lecture and Discussion

9 June 2017

6:30pm

Peel Lecture Theatre, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1SS

Philosopher Luce Irigaray’s most recent book, To Be Born (2017), offers a new way of conceiving what it means to be born and to give birth.

Join Luce Irigaray for an exploration of the mystery of our birth, the nature of existence and the responsibilities that being born entail for ourselves and our relations with others.

A Bristol Festival of Ideas event aimed at inspiring discussion and debate. 

£7 standard | £6 students/concessions | Free to ‘Genesis of a New Human Being’ conference attendees

Registration opens 17 May 2017 here: http://shop.bris.ac.uk/ (search ‘To Be Born’)

 

Luce Irigaray’s lecture is part of a series of events at the University of Bristol in June 2017 on To Be Born, including a conference from the 9-10 June, open to all, on the theme of ‘Genesis of a New Human Being:’ https://tinyurl.com/kovaagg

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Upcoming events: 9th-10th June 2017, Genesis of a New Human Being with Luce Irigaray, University of Bristol

Friday 21st July, RGS, London. Postgraduate Workshop: Reflecting on Qualitative Methods

Friday 21st July 10.00am – 4.30pm

Royal Geographical Society, London

Sponsored by: GFGRG*PGF*GLTRG*SCGRG*PyGyRg*GLTRG

 

Need some help working out your methodology?

Want to learn more about the RGS and it’s research groups?

Or just want to meet some other PhDs and chat through your ideas?

This workshop is designed to help students at the beginning of their PhD journeys to think critically about their methods and methodology and offer a space to meet and chat with other students in an informal atmosphere in the beautiful RGS building in central London.

 

Session Details

Innovative research methods & methodologies – an active participatory session thinking about how to innovate and make methods effective for ‘real life’ research.

Be Critical! – Round table exercise designed to encourage critical thought around research methods their implications.

 

Timetable

10.00 – Registration and casual networking (Coffee/Tea Provided)

10.30 – Introduction (Given by the Postgraduate representatives for the research groups)

10.45 – Key note speaker

12.00 – Lunch and networking

13.00 – Innovative research methods & methodologies

14.15 – Tea break and Networking

14.30 – Be Critical! Round table discussion

15.45 – Closing words

 

The Cost of the day including lunch is £12 per person.

For more information please contact Eve at eveleigh.buck@gmail.com

To book please visit the Eventbrite page.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Friday 21st July, RGS, London. Postgraduate Workshop: Reflecting on Qualitative Methods

Privilege and Gentrification: The Politics of Pushing Back. By Erin Sanders-McDonagh

One in a series of short pieces demonstrating the diverse research in gender and feminist geographies.   To comment or to write a post yourself, please contact our Web Coordinator, Louise Rondel at l.rondel@gold.ac.uk  We welcome posts by all members of the GFGRG.

I recently had what my best friend now calls ‘my Baltimore rant’ on Facebook. Having grown up in the suburbs of Baltimore, many of my friends from High School and University moved from the ‘burbs to live in this rapidly changing city on the east coast of America. Many of you will know Baltimore from The Wire, and your impressions of the city, portrayed in this gritty urban drama, will not be unfounded, with concerns about recent trends in rising crime rates being reported by international papers like the New York Times.

The rant stemmed from a recent Facebook post from an old friend that caught my eye. He and his wife had moved from the outskirts of northern Virginia, an area that has become increasingly expensive in the past decade, and had taken advantage of a new scheme in Baltimore called ‘Vacants to Value’. At first I was curious – the pictures of the row house he had bought certainly seemed run down – he had lived in a gated apartment block with a pool the last time I had seen him. This run down building seemed a bit unusual. And then I realized he had actually bought two row houses. And was building an enormous house from these vacant properties with the help of the scheme, breaking through the two houses to create a new, very beautiful and tastefully designed home for his growing family.

I started looking into the details of the scheme, and realized that these houses were not simply vacant. They were vacant for a reason. And then I had my rant.

Erin blog pic

Perhaps my rant was unfair – as it clearly implicated my friend, who had benefitted from the poverty and devastation of the black community in Baltimore. Indeed, my ire was less about my friend, and more about a policy that has allowed the already middle-class to take advantage of such schemes. Having grown up in a single-parent, working-class family, we didn’t have enough money to buy meat at the supermarket, or new clothes from department stores (shopping at the local thrift store for most of our clothing), but my prudent, hard-working mother was able to buy her own house after a decade of saving with the help of a grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. While HUD has continued to help some of the poorest Americans buy houses over the past years, it looks as if the Department will be gutted completely under Trump, meaning that those with the requisite capital are now able to take advantage of schemes that reinforce the growing gap between the rich and the poor, while the poor are screwed.

My college degree, paid for in large part by the largesse of the federal government (a luxury that students from low-income families like myself no longer have) has allowed me to climb that ever-more-elusive social ladder to the middle class. I have the privilege of a permanent full-time post in a wonderful academic institution in the UK, I own a car and a house (with a mortgage) in London. I live with my partner, who came from a small rural village in Ireland, from a family with a small cattle farm, whose mother knitted sweaters on a loom in their home to make extra money for their family of four. We eat pesto and smoked salmon (things neither of us had ever heard of growing up), and have prosecco at dinner parties (something we had never tried until our mid-twenties). We are now firmly, solidly middle class and we have profited from the changes to the area of north London where we live, an area that is also being gentrified.

Yes, I almost certainly benefit from the increasing money being spent on tearing down social housing in my area, and from the new flats that seem to appear almost overnight. Many of us writing about gentrification often benefit from these changes, either through increased house prices in areas that we could afford before gentrification started (but would not be able to buy, or even rent now), or through enjoying spaces in the city that have been created specifically for those privileged enough to be earning a middle class salary (even if we don’t consider ourselves to be middle class). But we have a responsibility to push back, through research and teaching, and through talking with friends (without ranting directly at them) about social issues and poverty.  The findings that characterize almost all the research I have conducted over the past decade – mostly with marginalized communities in England – have had a unique commonality that exacerbates violence, isolation, and social stigma:  poverty. My work suggests that a sustained lack of public sector funding for issues that overwhelmingly affect the most deprived communities is creating an increasingly unequal society. Those in the poorest areas are the most at risk, and whether we are talking about gentrification in London, or Vacants-to-Value in Baltimore, those with sufficient modes of capital must push back against policies that allow the process of gentrification that further marginalizes the already marginalized. Through these means (amongst others) we can try to make some small difference.

Dr Erin Sanders-McDonagh is from the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research, University of Kent.

Contact: E.Sanders-McDonagh@kent.ac.uk

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Privilege and Gentrification: The Politics of Pushing Back. By Erin Sanders-McDonagh

Who cares? The gendering of informal caring practices in a hospital-setting. By Katherine Morton

One in a series of short pieces demonstrating the diverse research in gender and feminist geographies.   To comment or to write a post yourself, please contact our Web Coordinator, Louise Rondel at l.rondel@gold.ac.uk  We welcome posts by all members of the GFGRG.

I have recently finished twelve months of fieldwork in the NHS, examining care of chronic lung disease patients. This has involved medical ethnography in emergency departments and respiratory wards in hospitals in England and Wales, and interviews with health professionals, patients and carers. My role as a geographer in the context of applied health research has raised a number of challenges and opportunities. One such opportunity has been to integrate geographical approaches with quality improvement methodologies and service evaluation in the public health sector.

In the context of healthcare, existing geographical approaches have included feminist critiques of the gendered nature of care, and the body work and emotional labour which it entails (Dyer et.al., 2008; Batnizky and McDowell, 2011). In an acute context, the emotional labour of nurses (Mauno et.al., 2016), doctors (Kerasidou and Horn, 2016) and healthcare assistants (Lovatt. et.al. 2015) has been addressed. This has been framed in temrs of the positive contribution such labour makes to patients, as well as the wellbeing ‘cost’ to healthcare professionals. Through preliminary analysis of observational and interview study data, a pertinent issue which has emerged is the formation of informal structures of care which families and/or friends often form in times of crisis. These informal and less visible care practices emerge- or adapt- in response to an unexpected admission to hospital. By ‘informal’, I mean that these individuals are not recognised within financial, legal or political frameworks as patient ‘carers’.

Such informal practices of care giving involve friends and/ or family adopting a range of responsibilities including liaising with health professionals about treatment plans, medication, and concerns about patient condition; researching patient illness/treatment/prognosis (and often developing an informal medical expertise); providing patients with transportation, clothing, toiletries, food and reading materials; and of course, providing emotional support to patients. These informal care practices appear to be particularly valuable around patient discharge, supporting the patient in the transition back to the community.

Clearly, such informal care is of enormous benefit to patient wellbeing, but often places a significant burden on the ‘care-giver’, in terms of finance, time, and carer wellbeing. Carers spoke of the demands of this role, reflecting on challenges of negotiating these responsibilities with other caring roles, such as parenting, paid employment and self-care. They also discussed the guilt they felt at having to manage this role at the cost of other responsibilities, and not necessarily being able to commit ‘enough’ time to patient care. These respondents were almost exclusively mothers, sisters, daughters and female friends of patients.

In an overstretched and underfunded NHS, where staff are expected to meet difficult targets with limited resources, the provision of informal structures of care seems more pertinent than ever. The un-quantified contribution that friends and family play in supporting patient care requires further attention. Examination of the hierarchies of power in which informal care is situated, as well as the identity politics of such care will be two avenues that further analysis will explore.

Dr Katherine Morton from the School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol is a member of the GFGRG.

Contact: k.morton@bristol.ac.uk

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Who cares? The gendering of informal caring practices in a hospital-setting. By Katherine Morton

The Gender Shocks from Nagaland. By Gaurav Sikka

One in a series of short pieces demonstrating the diverse research in gender and feminist geographies.   To comment or to write a post yourself, please contact our Web Coordinator, Louise Rondel at l.rondel@gold.ac.uk  We welcome posts by all members of the GFGRG.

This blog post is an initial reaction to a gender regressive step taken by the Nagaland government under the pressure of some of the ideologues according to whom, Naga women cannot collectively assert their rights and take decisions. These ideologues argue that the traditional customary practices never envisaged a political role for women in Naga tribal society. Therefore, the age-old patriarchy and gender rights are at loggerheads over the issue of women’s reservation in the urban local bodies in Nagaland.

The 74th amendment of the Constitution of India in 1993 has provided for reservation for women (at least 33 percent of the seats) in the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) across India. However, states like Nagaland were kept out of its purview on the premise that the tribal communities here practiced an egalitarian way of life where men and women had equal rights (Mukhim, 2017). However, a closer look at traditional tribal governance system reveals that women’s voices in the tribal meetings were represented by the male members of the families. Another paradox was that while women can attend those meetings, they cannot hold offices in those traditional bodies, ultimately curtailing the rights of womenfolk to participate in the decision making.

In 2006, after 13 years of the passage of 74th Amendment Act by the Parliament of India, the Nagaland State Assembly passed the Nagaland Municipal (First Amendment) Act, which provided for a 33 percent reservation of seats for Naga women.   However, nothing happened and status quo was maintained because this was opposed by Naga Hoho, an apex body of Naga tribal chiefs on the pretext that the reservation for women violates Article 371A of the Constitution of India which bestows protection to the Naga customary laws and practices. Nonetheless, as Urban Local Bodies are not customary institutions, the move to reserve seats for women in them does not violate the constitution.  Moreover, this argument, implausible and flimsy in nature, is put forth to preserve the patriarchal character of the Naga society and to prevent men from getting ‘inferiority complex when women are given equal status as men in decision-making bodies’ (Acharyya, 2017).

Eventually, the courts of the land intervened after a plea by a Naga women’s group and elections to the ULBs were ordered in January 2017 after the due reservation of seats for women. However, these efforts were bogged down by a violent agitation by Naga men who went on the rampage, vandalised public property and paralyzed the functioning of the state of Nagaland against the 33 percent reservation for women. Even the Naga women leaders were intimidated and attacked. The state government has buckled under the pressure following a violent agitation and has taken a U-turn and surrendered to the male-dominated Naga tribal bodies by declaring the entire election process null and void. Unfortunately, this retrograde move of depriving Naga women of their constitutional political rights has far reaching implications on gender equality in the Nagaland state and the rest of India. As evident from this development, it will not be incorrect to say that the politics have failed to correct social biases.

It is important to note here that Nagaland has a majority of the Christian population, 88 percent as per Census of India 2011. Therefore, the role of the church – another male-centric institution that also dominates the public discourse – needs to be questioned against the backdrop of the ongoing crisis.

The present crisis has made evident gender fault lines, has raised questions of identity and gender in a Naga society that has gone berserk to preserve its patriarchal character and has exposed the egalitarian notion of Naga tribal society.

Further readings

Acharyya, K.,  “Nagaland civic polls: Naga tribes to boycott elections to protest 33% reservation for women” in Firstpost on January 5, 2017 accessed at http://www.firstpost.com/india/nagaland-civic-polls-naga-tribes-to-boycott-elections-to-protest-33-reservation-for-women-3190086.html

Mukhim, P., “Tradition, Democracy and Gender” in The Hindu on February 10, 2017

Punj, B., “Selective Amnesia of Gender Rights Activists” in The Pioneer on February 13, 2017

Staff Reporter, “Nagaland Says No To Gender Equality” in Deccan Herald on February 11, 2017 accessed at http://www.deccanherald.com/content/595852/nagaland-says-no-gender-equality.html

Gaurav Sikka is a PhD Research Scholar at the Department of Geography, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi (India). He holds positions on the steering committee of International Geographical Union Task Force for Young and Early Career Geographers and the executive committee of Royal Geographical Society Gender & Feminist Geographies Research Group. Presently, Gaurav is teaching at the Department of Geography, Aditi Mahavidyalaya, University of Delhi.

Contact: gauravsikkageo@gmail.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on The Gender Shocks from Nagaland. By Gaurav Sikka